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Credits, Biographies, and Contact Information

 

Marc Stein ……… Research Coordinator

  marcs@sfsu.edu

 

Tamara de Szegheo Lang ......... Research Assistant – Digitization and Exhibit Design

  langt@yorku.ca

 

Healy Thompson ……… Research Assistant – Africa

  healy.thompson@gmail.com

 

Carly Simpson ……… Research Assistant – Asia and the Pacific

  csimpso8@yorku.ca

 

Shlomo Gleibman ……… Research Assistant – Latin America and the Caribbean

  shlomog@gmail.com 

 

Sage Milo ……… Research Assistant – Middle East

  sagemmilo@gmail.com

 

Darya (Dasha) Serykh ……… Research Assistant – Russia, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe 

   daryonka@yorku.ca

 

  

Biographies

 

Marc Stein is a historian of sexuality, a political activist, and an award-winning teacher, writer, editor, and scholar. He earned a B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1985 and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. After twenty years of teaching at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania (1995-96), Colby College in Maine (1996-98), and York University in Toronto (1998-2014), he was appointed the Jamie and Phyllis Pasker Professor of History at San Francisco State University in 2014. The author of City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves: Lesbian and Gay Philadelphia, 1945-1972 (University of Chicago Press, 2000), Sexual Injustice: Supreme Court Decisions from Griswold to Roe (University of North Carolina Press, 2010), and Rethinking the Gay and Lesbian Movement (Routledge, 2012), he also served as the editor-in-chief of the three-volume Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in America (Scribners, 2003). Stein is the former editor of Gay Community News in Boston, the former chair of the American Historical Association’s Committee on Lesbian and Gay History, and the former chair of the Organization of American Historians’ Committee on the Status of LGBTQ Historians and Histories.

 

Tamara de Szegheo Lang is a doctoral candidate in the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University in Toronto, Canada. Her research focuses on public history and the affective aspects of exhibiting queer histories in community-run archives and museums. In addition to her academic research, she serves as curatorial committee member at the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives in Toronto.

 

Healy Thompson holds an MA in Women's Studies and is a PhD candidate in Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies at York University in Toronto, ON. Her dissertation is tentatively titled “Protecting Women: Discourses of Vulnerability and Rescue in U.S. Domestic and Foreign Policy on Sexual and Reproductive Rights.” While completing work on her dissertation, Healy is working as the Outreach Officer at the Stephen Lewis Foundation.

 

Carly Simpson is a Ph.D. student in History at York University in Toronto, ON.

 

Shlomo Gleibman is completing a Ph.D. in Humanities at York University. He holds a B.A. cum laude in Russian Language and Literature from Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine) and M.A. in Humanities from York University (Toronto, ON). Shlomo's research is focused on Jewish queer history, literature, and culture.

 

Sage Milo is a PhD candidate in the Gender, Feminist & Women’s Studies Program at York University, Toronto. Their doctoral thesis is primarily concerned with the centrality of print culture to feminist politics. It examines British independent feminist (broadly defined) periodicals from the 1880s to the 1930s, with particular focus on the ways in which sexuality was represented and debated in them, to understand the unique impact such periodicals had in the development and diversification of feminist thought and politics in this period.  

 

Darya (Dasha) Serykh is completing a PhD in Social and Political Thought at York University in Toronto, Canada. Her MA research examined the ways that homophile and early gay and lesbian periodicals in the United States depicted Russia and the Soviet Union in the context of the Cold War. Her current research focuses on analyzing sexuality discourses in animal studies.